Press

Rooster holding a bouquet of red flowers. He's surrounded by long grass and red petals.

Intergenerational Design              

Phoenix Simms, Unwinnable, June 4, 2024

Rooster is an all-ages point-and-click puzzle adventure game by Sticky Brain Studios, a Toronto-based developer. The game seeks to celebrate Chinese history and culture in a unique way. Showcasing painterly graphics that evoke traditional watercolors and calligraphy, Rooster is a narrative-driven collection of twelve themed minigames.

Interview With Rooster Team Sticky Brain Studios – Really Great People Doing Really Great Work

David Carcasole, PSU, May 14, 2024

While researching and preparing for this interview, it had already started to become clear to me that the team at Sticky Brain Studios was one that got along quite well, a clarity that could have easily been shattered the moment I jumped on the call with each of them since this came from nothing more than me just catching a vibe.

Celebrating crafting, cozy games, and culture with the Rooster team

Daz Skubich, Pocket Tactics, May 1, 2024

We sat down with two members of the Sticky Brain Studios team to discuss Rooster, the studio’s upcoming point-and-click puzzle game inspired by Chinese culture.Sasha Boersma and Deborah Chantson on the importance of diversity, accessible game design and making audiences cry.

Toronto’s Sticky Brain celebrates Chinese culture and accessibility in Rooster

Bradly Shankar, MobileSyrup, April 12, 2024

Sasha Boersma and Deborah Chantson on the importance of diversity, accessible game design and making audiences cry.

How a Toronto company built a ‘system of flexibility’ for its neurodivergent employees

Brennan Doherty, Globe & Mail, March 15, 2024

Sasha Boersma occasionally gets a calendar booking from one of her dozen or so employees for a quick meeting. The employee has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and just wants to talk. More specifically, they’re struggling to stay awake and need someone to draw their attention for twenty minutes until their medication kicks in and they can finally focus.